Grab co-founder increase voting rights with Nasdaq listing

Malaysian internet entrepreneur Anthony Tan is set to dramatically increase his control over his company Grab when the south-east Asian tech group joins Nasdaq later this year.

In a move that would be the envy of his Silicon Valley peers, the Grab chief executive and co-founder will have 60.4 per cent of the voting power in the company while owning a stake of just 2.2 per cent.

This is a feat comparable to that of Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and unprecedented for a deal involving a special purpose acquisition company.

The holdings were contained in papers filed last week after the Singapore-based company unveiled a record deal to combine with a New York-listed Spac launched by Altimeter, a Silicon Valley group, valuing the business at almost $40bn.

The filing also revealed that the company, whose superapp offers everything from ride-hailing to deliveries and financial services, has reported potential violations of anti-corruption laws to the US Department of Justice.

Proponents say Tan needs the control to make quick and difficult decisions in navigating Grab’s eight markets. The deal is a crucial test of international investor appetite for a tech company with operations sprawled across the vastly diverse and emerging region of south-east Asia.

grab-co-founder-increase-voting-rights-with-nasdaq-listingBut his grip on the SoftBank-backed company’s direction marks the first time a Spac deal has entrenched a founder’s voting rights to this degree, say experts.

Such an overriding majority voting right for a chief executive is “unprecedented” for a company seeking a Spac route, said Robson Lee, a partner with Gibson Dunn’s Singapore office. “While it is not unusual for high tech companies seeking a listing to entrench management shares with additional voting rights, a 60 per cent absolute majority will be the first in the market,” Lee said.

Others put it more bluntly.

“By bypassing a traditional IPO, Grab has attracted less scrutiny over Anthony’s control,” said one investment banker with direct knowledge of the deal.

While common in the tech space, such arrangements are not always popular, as evidenced by the backlash against Adam Neumann, WeWork’s messianic co-founder, and shareholder protests faced by Zuckerberg, who holds about 60 per cent of the voting power at Facebook.

Details of Tan’s control did not surprise Grab’s rival, Indonesia-based super app Gojek. Merger talks between the two companies were abandoned late last year before Grab began considering a Spac merger, and people close to the talks said Tan had demanded control indefinitely as a “CEO for life”. Grab has denied the reports.

One long-term Grab investor said that Tan, who comes from one of Malaysia’s wealthiest families, “needs a high level of power” to negotiate a seat at the table at the region’s messily interlinked world of family-run conglomerates, politics and regulation.

“The issue is south-east Asia in itself is not a homogeneous market . . . It’s a collection of different markets with their own sets of regulatory considerations,” said Lawrence Loh, director of the Centre for Governance and Sustainability at the National University of Singapore.

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