Spy chiefs developing Minority Report-style tech that will be able to PREDICT time and place of terror attacks | Top Stories

Futuristic technology is being developed by chiefs which will predict when and where terrorist attacks will take place, according to The Sun.

Spy chiefs are investing heavily in a project called ‘Unblinking Eye’ to identify and monitor potential terrorists.

The futuristic scheme is similar to the 2002 Tom Cruise blockbuster Report, based on the Philip K Dick novel, which uses psychics to arrest murderers before they commit their predicted crime.

But the technology is likely to raise ethical questions, as it does in the movie.

According to The Sun, spy chiefs want to create a system that can predict flashpoints, hijackings and invasions around the world.



Government Communication Headquarters (GCHQ) in Cheltenham
Government Communication Headquarters (GCHQ) in Cheltenham



Tom Cruise - Minority report
The hit film showed a police force which could predict murder

It is hoped Unblinking Eye will be able to analyse human behaviour and help security services act.

The newspaper reports that Ministry of Defence bosses are hosting a competition to find experts who will “unlock the potential” to predict human behaviour from the vast amounts of data they put online.

It will reportedly be open to everyone from “a man in a shed” to large technology firms.

A spokesman for the Defence and Security Accelerator, overseeing the cross-government project, told the newspaper: “It will enable us to make interventions to prevent problems arising in the first place.”



Tom Cruise - Minority report
The developments are likely to lead to campaigns from civil liberties

Crime-predicting AI was touted in India in April this year.

Cortica, an Israeli company with deep roots in security and AI research, formed a partnership in India with Best Group to analyze the terabytes of data streaming from CCTV cameras in public areas. One of the goals is to improve safety in public places, such as city streets, bus stops, and train stations, reported Digital Trends.

Facial recognition software is currently being test run in parts of London, despite concerns from civil liberties groups.

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